Saturday, August 10, 2013

On The Trail of Tears with a Cousin (5 Generations Back) James Starr and His Family (My Starrs - Not Hal's)




B.B. Cannon and the James Starr Family Took the Most Northern Route with the Dotted Line

 Conductor:   B B Cannon
      Principal Cherokee: James Starr
       355 persons by land (15 died)
       Left 10/15/1837, arrived 12/29/1837
Asst Conductors:     Ezekiel S Curry
                                 Jackson Scott
                                 Thomas P Wells
     Physician:                 Grandville Townsend
     Interpreter:                Charles Reese
     Wagon Master:         Thomas Prigmore
     Disbursing Agt:         Mr. Reynolds
     Contractor:                L A Kincannon


B.B. Cannon's Journal

Cannon, B.B. - 1837 - Cherokee Removal
B. B. Cannon’s Journal of Occurrences with a Party of Cherokee Emigrants.  October 1837 
A Journal of occurrences in conformity with the Revised Regulations No 5. Paragraph 8. kept by B. B. Cannon, Conductor of a Party of Emigrating Cherokee Indians, put in his charge, at the Cherokee Agency East, by Genl. N. Smith, Superintendent of Cherokee removals, on the 13th day of October 1837.
Oct. 13th, 1837.
            Sent the wagons to the Indian encampment and commenced loading, in the evening.
Oct. 14th, 1837.
            Completed loading the wagons and crossed the Highwassee river at Calhoun, encamped, at 5 o’c. P.M.
Oct. 15th, 1837.
            Marched the Party at 8 o”c. A.M. halted and encamped at Spring Creek, at 11 o’c A.M. where Genl. Smith mustered the Party, which consumed the remainder of the day, 5 miles to day.
Oct. 16th, 1837.
            Marched at 8 o’c. A.M., halted and encamped at Kelly’s ferry on Tennessee river, at 4 o’c. P.M.  Issued corn & fodder, Corn meal & bacon, 14 miles to day.
Oct. 17th, 1837.
            Commenced ferrying the Tennessee river at 8 o’c. A.M., having been detained until the sun dispelled the fog, every thing being in readiness to commence at day light, completed ferrying at 4 o’c. P.M. and reached little [p. 2] Richland creek at 8 o’c. P.M.., where  the Party had been directed to halt and encamp, Issued corn & fodder, 7 miles to day.
Oct. 18th, 1837.
            Marched at 7 ½ o’c. A.M., one of the provision wagons oversat, detained a half hour, no damage done, ascended Wallens ridge, (the ascent 2 miles) halted at Ragsdale’s at 1 ½ o’c. P.M., encamped and issued corn & fodder, corn-meal & bacon, 10 miles further to water, all wearied getting up the mountain, 5 miles today.
Oct. 19th, 1837.
            Marched at 7 ½ o’c. A. M. descended the mountain, halted at 2 o’c. P.M., at Sequachee river near Mr. Springs, Issued corn & fodder, 11 ½ miles to day.
Oct. 20th, 1837.
            Marched at 6 ½ o’c. A.M., ascended the Cumberland mountain, halted at Mr. Flemings, ¾ past 3 o’c. P.M., encamped and issued corn & fodder, corn meal & Bacon, 14 ½ miles to day.
Oct. 21st, 1837.
            Marched at 7 ½ o’c. A.M., descended the mountain, halted at Collins river, 4 1/r o’c. P.M., encamped and issued corn & fodder, the Indians appear fatigued this evening.  13 miles today—road extremely rough.
Oct. 22nd, 1837.
            Marched at 8 o’c. A.M. passed through McMinnville, halted at Mr. Britts ½ past 12 o’c. M., encamped and issued corn & fodder, corn meal & Bacon, Sugar [p. 3] and coffee to the waggoners & Interpreters, no water for 12 miles ahead, procured a quantity of corn meal and bacon to day.  ##  7 ½ miles to day.
Oct. 23rd, 1837.
            Marched at 6 ½ o’c. A.M., Capt. Prigmore badly hurt by a wagon horse attempting to run away, halted at Stone river near Woodbury, Te. ½ past 4 o’c. P.M., encamped and issued corn & fodder, 20 miles to day.
Oct. 24th, 1837.
            Marched at 7 ½ o’c. A. M., halted at Mr. Yearwoods, 4 o’c. P.M., rained last night and to day, Issued corn & fodder, corn meal and bacon, 15 miles to day.
Oct. 25th, 1837.
            Marched at 8 o’c. A.M., buried Andrew’s child at ½ past 9 o’c. A.M., passed through Murfreesborough, halted at Overall’s creek, 4 o’c. P.M., encamped and issued corn and fodder, 14 miles to day.
Oct. 26th, 1837.
            Marched at 8 o’c. A.M., passed through three turnpike Gates, halted at Mr. Harris, 3 o’c. P.M., encamped and issued corn & fodder, corn meal & bacon, 16 ½ miles to day.
Oct. 27th, 1837.
            Marched at 7 ½ o’c. A.M., passed through two Turn-

##  I would remark here that all supplies, both of forage and subsistence, were purchased, and Pikages, toll and ferriages contracted for on the way west by a contracting agent, and paid for on my request by Doct. Reynolds, the [continued at the bottom of page 4]

[p. 4] pike gates, and crossed the Cumberland river on the Nashville toll bridge, at Nashville, halted at Mr. Putnams ½ past 3 o’c. P.M., encamped and issued corn & fodder, Isaac Walker and [sic] emigrant belonging to the Party, overtook us.  Mr. L. A. Kincannon, contracting agent, left us, and returned home, having, on the way, near McMinnville signified his intention, verbally, to do so, assigning as the reason the delicate situation of his health, 13 miles to day.
Oct. 28th, 1837.
            Rested for the purpose of washing clothes, repairing wagons, and shoeing horses.  Reese, Starr and others of the emigrants visited Genl. Jackson who was at Nashville, Issued corn & fodder, corn-meal and bacon, Assigned Mr. E. S. Curry to supply the place of Mr. Kincannon.
Oct. 29th, 1837.
            Marched at 8 ½ o’c. A.M., halted at Long creek ½ past 2 o’c. P.M., encamped and issued corn & fodder, 13 ½ miles to day.
Oct. 30th, 1837.
            Marched at 7 ½ o’c A.M., halted at Little red river ½ past 5 o’c. P.M., encamped and issued corn & fodder, corn-meal & Bacon, 18 ½ miles to day.
Oct. 31st, 1837.
            Marched at 8 o’c. A.M., halted at Graves, Ken. 3 o’c. P.M., Issued corn & fodder, 16 miles to day.

Disbursing Agent for the Party.

[p. 5]
Nov. 1st, 1837.
            Marched at 8 o’c., A.M., buried Ducks child, passed throug [sic] Hopkinsville, Ken, halted at Mr. Northerns ½ past 5 o’c. P.M.  Encamped & issued corn & fodder, Flour and bacon, 19 miles to day.
Nov. 2nd, 1837.
            Marched at 8 o’c. A.M. and halted one mile in advance of Mr. Mitchersons, 3 o’o. P.M., encamped and issued corn and fodder.
Nov. 3rd, 1837.
            David Timpson and Pheasant, emigrants belonging to the party, came up last night in the stage, having been heretofore enrolled, and mustered, marched at 8 o’c. A.M., passed thro’ Princeton, Ken., halted and encamped near Mr. Barnetts, at ½ past 4 o’c. P.M.  Issued corn & fodder, Flour & bacon, 17 miles to day.
Nov. 4th, 1837.
            Marched at 8 o’c. A.M., halted and encamped at Threlkelds branch, 4 o’c, P.M., Issued corn & fodder, 15 miles to day.
Nov. 5th, 1837.
            Marched at 8 o’c. A.M., passed thro’ Salem, Ken., halted and encamped at another Mr. Threlkelds branch at 4 o’c. P.M., Issued corn & fodder, corn meal, a small quantity of flour, and bacon, 13 ½ miles to day.
Nov. 6th, 1837.
            Marched at 7 o’c. A.M., arrived at Berry’s ferry (Golconda opposite on the Ohio river) 9 o’c. A.M., every thing in readiness to commence ferrying, but [p. 6]
Prevented on account of the extreme high winds and consequent roughness of the river, which continued the remainder of the day, encamped in the evening, Issued corn & fodder, 5 ½ miles to day.
Nov. 7th, 1837.
Commenced ferrying at ½ past 5 o’c. A.M., moved the Party as it crossed one mile out and encamped.  Completed crossing 4 o’c. P.M., all safely, Issued corn & fodder, corn meal & bacon, 1 mile to day.
Nov. 8th, 1837.
            Marched at 8 o’c. A.M., Mr. Reese & myself remained behind, and buried a child of Seabolts, overtook the Party, halted and encamped at Big Bay creek, 4 o’c. P.M., Issued corn & fodder, (James Starr & wife, left this morning with two carry-alls to take care of, and bring on three of their children, who were too sick to travel—with instructions to overtake the Party as soon as possible without endangering the lives of their children.)—15 miles to day.
Nov. 9th, 1837.
            Marched at 8 o’c., A.M., halted and encamped at Cash creek, ½ past 4 o’c. P.M., Issued corn & fodder, corn meal & Bacon, 15 miles to day.
Nov. 10th, 1837.
            Marched at 8 o’c. A.M., were detained 2 hours on the way making a bridge across a small creek, halted at Cypress creek, 4 o’c., P.M., encamped and issued corn & fodder, & salt, 14 miles to day. [p. 7]
Nov. 11th, 1837.
            Marched at 8 o’c, A.M., passed thro’ Jonesboro’ Ill., halted and encamped at Clear creek, in the Mississippi river bottom, ½ past 3 o’c. P. M., Issued corn & fodder, corn meal & bacon—13 miles to day, issued sugar & coffee to the wagoners, & interpreters.
Nov. 12th, 1837.
            Marched at 8 o’c. A.M., arrived at Mississippi river, 10 o’c. A.M., Commenced ferrying, at 11 o’c. A. M., directed the party to move a short distance as they crossed the river, and encamp, Issued corn & fodder, Starr came up, the health of his children but little better, Richard Timberlake and George Ross, overtook us and enrolled, attached themselves to Starrs family.
Nov. 13th, 1837.
            Continued ferrying from 7 o’c. until 10 o’c. A.M., when the wind arose and checked our progress, 3 o’c. P.M., resumed and made our trip, suspended at 5 o’c. P.M., Issued corn & fodder, corn meal & bacon, buried another of Duck’s children to day.
Nov. 14th, 1837.
            Crossed the residue of the Party, Marched at 10 o’c. A. M., halted and encamped at Mr. William’s, Issued corn & fodder, sickness prevailing, 5 miles to day.
Nov. 15th, 1837.
            Rested for the purpose of washing &c., Issued corn and fodder, corn meal and bacon.
Nov. 16th, 1837.
            Marched at 8 o’c. A. M., left Reese, Starr and fam- [p. 8] ilies on account of sickness in their families, also James Taylor (Reese’s son in law) and family, Taylor himself being very sick, with instructions to overtake the Party, passed thro’ Jackson, Mo., halted & encamped at widow Roberts on the road via Farmington &c., Issued corn only, no fodder to be had, 17 miles to day.
Nov. 17th, 1837.
            Marched at 8 o’c. A. M., halted at White Water creek 4 o’c. P.M., Issued corn & fodder, corn meal and beef, 13 miles to day.
Nov. 18th, 1837.
            Marched at 8 o’c. A.M., halted and encamped at Mr. Morand’s 5 o’c. P.M., Issued corn & fodder, Flour & bacon, 16 miles to day.
Nov. 19th, 1837.
            Marched at 8 o’c. A.M., halted and encamped ½ past 4 o’c. P.M., at Wolf creek, Issued corn & fodder, 14 miles to day.
Nov. 20th, 1837.
            Marched at 8 o’c. A.M., passed thro’ Farmington, Mo., halted at St. Francis river, 4 o’c. P.M., encamped and issued corn & fodder, Flour & beef, 15 miles to day.
Nov. 21st, 1837.
            A considerable number drunk last night obtained the liquor at Farmington yesterday, had to get out of bed about midnight to quell the disorder, a refusal by several to march this morning, alledging [sic] that they would wait for Starr & Reese to come up at that place, Marched at 8 o’c., A. M. in defiance of threats and attempts to intimidate, none remained behind, [p. 9] passed through Caledonia, halted at Mr. Jacksons, encamped and issued corn & fodder, beef and Bacon, mostly bacon, 14 miles to day.
Nov. 22nd 1837.
            Marched 8 ½ o’c. A.M., pass through the lead mines (or Courtois diggings), halted at Scotts, 4 o’c. P.M., issued corn, fodder, and corn meal, 13 miles to day.
Nov. 23rd, 1837.
            Rested for the purpose of repairing wagons, shoeing horses, washing &c., Starr, Reese, and Taylor came up, the health of their families in some degree improved, Issued corn & fodder, and beef, weather very cold.
Nov. 24th, 1837.
            Marched at 8 ½ o’c. A.M., Considerable sickness prevailing, halted at Huzza creek, 4 o’c. P.M., encamped and issued corn & fodder, 12 miles to day.
Nov. 25th, 1837.
            Doct. Townsend, officially advised a suspension of our march, in consequence of the severe indisposition of several families, for a time sufficient for the employment of such remedial agents as their respective cases might require.  I accordingly directed the Party to remain in camp and make the best possible arrangement for the sick, In the evening issued corn & fodder, flour and beef.
Nov. 26th, 1837.
Remained in camp, sickness continuing and increasing, Issued corn & fodder, beef & corn meal. [p. 10]
Nov. 27th, 1837.
            Remained in camp, sickness continuing to increase, Issued corn & fodder, Bacon & corn meal.
Nov. 28th, 1837.
            Moved the Detachment two miles further to a Spring and School-house, obtained permission for as many of the sick to occupy the school-house as could do so, a much better situation for an encampment than on the creek, sickness increasing, Issued corn & fodder.
Nov. 29th, 1837.
            Remained in camp, sickness still increasing, buried Corn Tassels child to day, Issued corn & fodder.
Nov. 30th, 1837.
            Remained in camp, sickness continuing, Issued corn and fodder.
December 1st, 1837.
            Remained in camp, sickness abating, Issued cor and fodder, Bacon & corn meal, Buried Oolanheta’s child to day.
Decr. 2nd, 1837.
            Remained in camp, sickness abating, Issued corn & fodder, Beef & corn meal.
Decr. 3rd, 1837.
            Remained in camp, sickness abating, Issued corn & fodder.
Decr. 4th, 1837.
            Marched at 9 o’c. A.M., Buried George Killian, [p. 11] and left Mr. Wells to bury a waggoner, (black boy) who died this morning, scarcely room in the wagons for the sick, halted at Mr. Davis, 12 past 4 o.c. P.M., had to move down the creek a mile off the road, to get wood, Issued corn & fodder and corn meal, 11 miles to day.
Decr. 5th, 1837.
            Marched 9 o’c. A.M., left two waggoners (black boys) at Mr. Davis sick, this morning, halted at the Merrimack river, ½ past 3 o’c. P.M., Encamped and issued corn and fodder, corn meal and beef, 10 miles to day.
Decr. 6th, 1837.
            Marched at 9 o’c. A.M., passed Masseys Iron works, halted at Mr. Jones’ ½ past 3 o’c. P. M., encamped and issued corn and fodder, 12 miles to day.
Decr. 7th, 1837.
            Marched at 8 ½ o’c., A.M., Reese’s team ran away, broke his wagon and Starrs carry-all, left him and family to get his wagon mended, at 17 miles, and to overtake if possible, halted at Mr. Bates son, 5 o’c., P.M., encamped and issued corn and fodder, corn-meal & bacon, 20 miles to day.
Decr. 8th, 1837.
            Buried Nancy Bigbears Grand Child, marched at 9 o’c. A.M., halted at Piney a small river, ½ past 3 o’c. P.M., rained all day, encamped and issued corn only, no fodder to be had, several drunk, 11 miles to day. [p. 12]
December the 9th, 1837.
            Marched at 9 o’c. A.M., Mayfields wagon broke down at about a mile left him to get it mended and overtake, halted at Waynesville, Mo. 4 o’c. P.M., encamped and issued corn & fodder, beef & corn meal, weather extremely cold, 12 ½ miles to day.
Decr. 10th, 1837.
            Marched at 8 o’c. A.M., halted at the Gasconade river 4 o’c. P.M., Issued corn & fodder.  14 miles to day.
Decr. 11th, 1837.
            Marched at ½ past 8 o’c. A. M., halted at Sumner’s 4 o’c. P.M., encamped and issued corn & fodder.  15 miles to day.
Decr. 12th, 1837.
            Marched at 9 o’c. A.M., halted one mile in advance of Mr. Parkes at a branch, 4 o’c. P. M., encamped and issued corn & fodder, corn meal, beef and a small quantity of bacon.  14 miles to day.
Decr. 13th, 1837.
            Marched at 8 ½ o’c. A. M., halted at a branch near Mr. Eddington’s, 4 o’c. P.M., encamped and issued corn & fodder, Reese & Mayfield came up, 13 ½ miles today.
Decr. 14th, 1837.
            Marched at 8 o’c. A. M., halted at James fork of White river, near the road but which [p. 13] does not cross the road, 3 o’c. P. M., Mr. Wells taken sick, Issued corn meal, corn & fodder, 15 ½ miles to day.
Decr. 15th, 1837.
            Joseph Starrs wife had a child last night.  Marched at 8 ½ o’c. A. M., halted at Mr. Danforths, 1 ½ P. M., waggoners having horses shod until late at night, encamped & issued corn & fodder & beef.  10 ½ miles to day.
Decr. 16th, 1837.
            Issued sugar & coffee to the waggoners & Interpreters this morning, Marched at 9 o’c. A. M., passed through Springfield Mo., halted at Mr. Clicks, 4 o’c. P. M., encamped and issued corn & fodder and corn-meal.  12 miles to day. (left Mr. Wells)
Decr. 17th, 1837.
            Snowed last night, Buried Eleges wife and Chas. Timberlakes son (Smoker), Marched at 9 o’c. A. M., halted at Mr. Dyes 3 o’c P.M., extremely cold weather, sickness prevailing to a considerable extent, all very much fatigued, encamped and issued corn & fodder, & beef.  10 miles to day.
Decr. 18th, 1837.
            Detained on account of sickness, Doct. Townsend sent back to Springfield for medicines, buried Dreadful Waters this evening, Issued corn and fodder & corn meal.   [p. 14]
Decr. 19th, 1837.
            Detained to day also on account of sickness, cold intense, Issued corn & fodder and beef.
Decr. 20th, 1837.
            Marched at 8 ½ o’c. A. M., halted at Mr. Allens ½ past 3 o’c. P. M., encamped, and issued corn & fodder & corn meal.  15 miles to day.
Decr. 21st, 1837.
            Marched at 8 o’c. A. M., halted at Lockes on Flat creek, 12 past 3 o’c. P. M., encamped and issued corn & fodder, & beef.  15 miles to day.
Decr. 22nd, 1837.
            Buried Goddards Grand child, Marched at 8 o’c. A. M., halted at McMurtrees, 3 o’c. P.M., encamped and issued corn & fodder and corn-meal.  15 miles to day.
Decr. 23rd, 1837.
            Buried Rainfrogs daughter (Lucy Redstick’s child).  Marched at 8 o’c. A. M. halted at Reddix, 3 o’c. P. M., encamped and issued corn & fodder & beef.  16 miles to day.
Decr. 24th, 1837.
            Marched at 8 o’c. A. M., halted at the X hollows, had to leave the road ¾ of a mile to get water, 3 o’c. P. M., Issued corn & fodder, Pork and corn meal.  15 miles to day.
Decr. 25th, 1837.
            Marched at 8 o’c. A. M., took the right hand [p. 15] road to Cane hill, at Fitzgeralds, halted a half mile in advance of Mr. Cunninghams at a branch, 3 o’c. P. M., Issued corn & fodder and salt Pork.  15 ½ miles to day.
Decr. 26th, 1837.
            Marched at 8 o’c. A.M., halted at James Coulters on Cane hill, Ark. ½ past 3 o’c P. M., encamped and issued corn meal, corn & fodder, 16 ½ miles to day.
Decr. 27th, 1837.
            Buried Alsey Timberlake, Daughter of Chas Timberlake, Marched at 8 o’c. A. M., halted at Mr. Beans, in the Cherokee nation west, at ½ past 2 o’c. P. M., encamped and issued corn & fodder, Fresh pork & some beef.  12 miles to day.
Decr. 28th, 1837.
            The Party refused to go further, but at the same time pledged themselves to remain together until the remuster was made by the proper officer, for whom I immediately sent an express to Fort Gibson, they alleged at the same time that the refusal was in consequence of the sickness now prevailing and that only.
            Doct. Reynolds Disbursing agent for the Party dismissed the wagons from further service, Buried another child of Chas Timberlakes, and one which was born (untimely) [p. 16] yesterday of which no other account than this is taken, Jesse Half Breeds wife had a child last night, issued Pork, corn meal and flour, corn & fodder for to day.
            Lieut. Van Horne arrived late this evening, having missed the express on the way.
Decr. 29th, 1837.
            Remustered the Party, Issued a small quantity of corn meal & Pork yet on hand.
Decr. 30th, 1837.
            Completed the Rolls of Remuster, turned over the Party to Lieut. Van Horne, and dismissed my assistants.
Respectfully submitted B. B. Cannon
Source: [National Archives Record Group 75, Records of the Bureau of Indian Affairs, Letters Received, Cherokee Emigration, 1837, C-553, filed in Special Case 249]B Cannon is in Special Files, Bureau of Indian Affairs; no Muster     Roll.  This detachment was the first to travel the overland route through Tennessee, Kentucky, Illinois, and Missouri later used by most of the  other Removal wagon trains]

James Starr (1796 - 1845) My 1st Cousin Five Generations Back
Son of Caleb Starr from Starr Mountain, TN

James was born on Starr Mountain, the second oldest of 14 children. In his early 20's he married the Maugh sisters, Nellie and Sukie about 1 year apart. In 1843 he married Sally Acorn. Sukie had died in 1840. With the 3 wives he had 20 or 21 children.


The signing of the Treaty of New Echota on Dec. 29, 1835, as depicted at the New Echota Historic Site in Calhoun, Ga. The signers are shown signing the treaty in the parlor of former Cherokee Phoenix Editor Elias Boudinot.


The Treaty of New Echota was a treaty signed on December 29, 1835, in New EchotaGeorgia by officials of the United States government and representatives of a minority Cherokee political faction, known as the Treaty Party.[1] The treaty was amended and ratified by the US Senate in March 1836, despite protests from the Cherokee National Council and its lacking the signature of the Principal Chief John Ross.
The treaty established terms under which the entire Cherokee Nation was expected to cede its territory in the Southeast and move west to the Indian Territory. Although the treaty was not approved by the Cherokee National Council, it was ratified by the U.S. Senate and became the legal basis for the forcible removal known as the Trail of Tears.


From Cherokee Archives: The Murder of James Starr

The murder of James Starr November 9, 1845 added fuel to the fire that burst forth with the assassination of the Ridges and Elias Boudinot June 22, 1839. James Starr, like the previous ones killed, was a member of the treaty Party who signed the Treaty of New Echota December 29, 1835. There was a price on the head of each person who signed that document. He was among the first to be persuaded that emigration of the west was the best course. He came West along with the bulk of the Treaty Party. There were a number of murders between June 22, 1839 and the murder of James Starr, but none shook the Cherokee Nation as did the latter event. Vengeance was meted out to James Starr early Sunday Morning November 9, 1845 when a company if 32 men bedecked with war paint rode up to his home in the Flint district. James' wife saw the men approaching and went to warn her husband of the impending trouble. James told her to remain calm and permit the men to search the house. He went to the washstand on the front proch and washed his hands and face. He was drying his face when one of the men opened fire without warning, killing him instantly. Buck Starr, a crippled son, about 14 years of age, was standing nearby. His mother told him to run, but he could only hobble slowly, and he was shot, dying a month or so afterward. There were 3 small sons in the house, and it is said that an attempt was made to kill them, but Mrs Starr wrapped her shirt about two of them and the grandmother hugged the oldest one to her. The men left, realizing they could not kill the boys without killing the women, and they had no desire to harm women.
The raiders then went to Pollie Rider's home, Where Sewell Rider was shot. According to Hill and Starr in "Footprints in the Indian Territory" as Sewell lay wounded on the ground, an Indian named Stand jumped from his horse and stabbed the wounded man in his heart. As they left, they encountered another of James' sons, Washington, whom they shot, desperately wounding him before he could escape.
Tom Starr lived about 2 miles from his father, and Creek Starr, the oldest of the sons at home, ran and told Tom the news, which was to trigger a series of the most vengeful vendettas of all time.
It is reported that James Starr had 21 children, but only the younger ones dared to attend the funeral, as the older ones were afraid they would be murdered if they appeared. The Arkansas Intelligence reported that soon after the murder of James Starr plans were being made to kill all of his sons.
John Ross was accused of at least being the perpetrator of the slaying of the Starrs, The Ridges, Elias Boudinot and Rider, but no proof was ever produced of such. Some thought it was a radical element of the so called Ross Faction. It might be pointed out, however, the the retaliatory actions of the treaty party were featured to a greater extent in the "Cherokee Advocate" than similar acts by the Ross Followers.  



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